Surgery items under review after insurer rort claims

But insurers now say their bills for medical devices only fell by $13 million last year, not the $250 million promised, because of an 19 per cent increase in the volume of “general and miscellaneous” items used in hospitals, Insurer lobby group Private Healthcare Australia said rebates for these items – including skin glues, sponges and temporary tubes – increased 19.2 per cent last financial year, even as the number of surgeries carried out rose only 0.3 per cent. Health minister Greg Hunt’s office said the review would consider medical…

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Masked Singer, Rugby World Cup help Ten secure October ad market lift

Nine Entertainment Co, owner of The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, took out the biggest revenue share for the month at 40.5 per cent, up from 38.4 per cent in September and 39.7 per cent in October 2018. Ten’s result was influenced by the launch of reality TV show The Masked Singer  and the Rugby World Cup tournament, which largely took place during the month. The network was narrowly up year-on-year, recording a 24.8 per cent share in October 2018 but significantly up from 19.7 per cent in September.…

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At 70, Carol is growing a social media platform with her son

“With the age group I’m in, I saw this happening with many of my friends,” Carol, who is now 70, says. The duo had run technology businesses together before and built an online platform for small business contract referrals. They decided to rework it into a site for building social connections between those over 55 years old. They invested around $750,000 in Chirpy Plus, a members-only site that also connects users to local meet-up groups, online bingo and an emergency call function to directly connect users to family and friends.…

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‘Governments are going to mandate’ fact-checking on Facebook: AAP boss

“I think for Facebook it’s a great initiative because clearly they recognise they’re facing a lot of criticisms for content that is incorrect and misleading and they’re doing something about it. Governments are going to mandate that some of the things that are published have to be checked. AAP CEO Bruce Davidson “It might take a while to grow to a level that will make a big difference but we’re really pleased about potentially helping in that regard and it’s a revenue stream for us as well,” he said. AAP…

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All eyes on Disney+ as Nine moves to soothe shareholders over Stan

Stan’s parent company Nine Entertainment Co is also the owner of The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. For Stan, the first challenge for Stan will be to withstand the loss of Disney’s popular content from its own service. Stan had record sign ups over the summer period last year after getting access to Disney movies and launching new Australian original series Bloom. While the 2019 financial year was overall a loss for Stan, the service has been profitable on an earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation and cash…

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Melbourne biotech start-up Karma3 CEO James Sackl facing fraud charges, resigns from board

The entrepreneur was charged under the name “Andrew Sackl” and the matter is set for trial in May. If Mr Sackl is found guilty, he could be barred from being a company director. However, it is unclear whether Karma3’s board members and investors were made aware of Mr Sackl’s charges. Karma3 is in the process of raising $3 million to $5 million in capital and has been profiled by ABC, Vice and China’s largest media organisation,  Xinhua. Karma3’s chairman, former CSIRO scientist and Order of Australia recipient Professor Paul Wood,…

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Uber Eats driver sacked for being 10 minutes late seeks tribunal appeal

“The tribunal said there is not an obligation to log on the Uber app. But there is an obligation to work when you log on and if you don’t accept jobs, your rating goes down. If the rating goes below 85 per cent, you get cut off. If there is no fixed time, how could they say she was late? Santosh Gupta “Uber says there is no fixed time to reach a location. But if there is no fixed time, how could they say she was late?” The Transport Workers’…

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larger breast sizes create retail growth

Fitting by eye Brava first opened its doors in 2006 with one store in the Melbourne suburb of Prahran. As a retailer, if we are not keeping up with changing body shapes, we will be left behind. Maxine Windram Windram says she was “quite naive” and didn’t know anything about bra-fitting but quickly worked out using tape measures didn’t work with a fuller bust because breasts are all about volume. “We realised we needed to take a more holistic approach and threw the tape measures away,” she says. Brava’s fitters…

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Federal ‘green bank’ and Mike Cannon Brookes back new ‘agrifood’ fund

The global agricultural sector accounts for about 14 per cent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions. Mr Cannon-Brookes said in a statement: “Innovation in agriculture is desperately needed across the world to make our planet more sustainable. Mike Cannon-Brookes. Credit:Louie Douvis Kick-starting this industry in Australia will take guts and expertise, and the CEFC brings both. Mike Cannon-Brookes “Kick-starting this industry in Australia will take guts and expertise, and the CEFC brings both.” The CEFC was established under the Gillard government in 2012 to spur investment in clean energy while it…

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The future of the truth economy in a web of internet lies

And with more information than ever being shared online at a rapid pace by anyone with an internet connection, this makes it difficult for those trying to stay informed. This is a problem for journalism, but it is an even bigger problem for society. Former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger In journalist and editor Alan Rusbridger’s new book Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now he puts the issue into focus, explaining that he had seen the situation play out online where it “was harder for good…

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