Aussie town having the least sex


The results of the Australia Talks survey were revealed on ABC Monday night, with hosts Annabel Crabb and Waleed Aly discussing the answers given to the 500 questions.

The intimate survey revealed that:

• A third of Aussies often have “difficulty making ends meet”

• Just under 50 per cent think it is OK to smack children

• 48 per cent think our economy will be worse in the next few years

• 84 per cent believe climate change is real and think action should be taken

• 82 per cent of Australians think indigenous people face discrimination

• 18 to 24-year-olds and people over 75 are having the least sex out of any age groups

• 45 per cent agree there are more than two genders

• 43 per cent agree January 26 is the wrong day to celebrate Australia Day

• 90 per cent think big businesses care more about profit than what’s best for Australia

• 90 per cent think politicians will lie if the truth will hurt them politically

• 93 per cent think Australians should show more respect to each other

The show was hosted by Annabel Crabb and Waleed Aly. Picture: Australia Talks/ABCSource:ABC

AUSSIES’ SURPRISING SEX LIVES

There were a lot of questions about divisive issues but some of the more private questions Aussies were asked to answer was about their sex lives.

Around half of people are having sex once a month, with a third doing it less than that.

The age group having the most sex are people in their 30s, with two thirds having it once a month or more.

Surprisingly, young people and the elderly returned similar results for this question.

Those between the ages of 18 to 24 and those 75 or over were almost tied as the age groups having the least amount of sex.

From the results, it was revealed residents in one Australian town were having the least amount of sex in the whole country.

The NSW town of Port Macquarie took out the top spot as the most sexless area in Australia.

Port Macquarie took out the top spot for the most sexless Aussie town.

Port Macquarie took out the top spot for the most sexless Aussie town.Source:Supplied

AUSTRALIA’S MOST DIVISIVE ISSUE

Of all the questions people were asked, one came out on top as the issue causing the biggest split in opinion.

Those who took the survey were asked whether they agree or disagree with the statement: “Australia Day should not be celebrated on January 26”.

The answers leaned more towards agree but only slightly, with 43 per cent agreeing with the statement and 40 per cent disagreeing.

From these numbers 28 per cent strongly agreed and 30 per cent strongly disagreed.

The date of Australia Day was the most divisive issue for Aussies. Picture: Australia Talks/ABC

The date of Australia Day was the most divisive issue for Aussies. Picture: Australia Talks/ABCSource:ABC

The second most divisive issue facing Australians is whether there are more than two genders.

From the survey, 45 per cent of Australians agreed there are more than two genders, while 38 per cent disagreed.

Crabb noted this was an issue that Australians hadn’t been facing for a very long time, compared to some of the issues being tackled in the survey.

“This is one of those issues where community opinion is changing really quickly and I think a lot of people who were asked to consider this maybe haven’t been thinking about it for all that long,” she said.

“It will be really interesting to see what they think in two years’ time and five years’ time.”

The majority of people agreed there are more than two genders. Picture: Australia Talks/ABC

The majority of people agreed there are more than two genders. Picture: Australia Talks/ABCSource:ABC

The third most divisive issue came when people were asked whether the decline of the traditional family has made Australia worse.

Forty six per cent of people thought that the decline in the traditional family had impacted Australia in a negative way, while 37 per cent disagreed.

Of this, 21 per cent strongly agreed and 19 per cent strongly disagreed.

Aly noted this question also had quite a high number of people who were neutral on the issue.

“I think this is one of those classic eye of the beholder type questions – what does the decline of the traditional family even mean?” he asked

“Maybe it’s for that reason this question had a really high ‘neutral’ and ‘don’t know’ response, which is unusual for the questions we got.”

Around 14 per cent chose to stay neutral on the topic and three per cent said they didn’t know.

“When you boil it down, I suppose it’s about tradition and whether or not you think tradition is something to be preserved and protected and its decline to be mourned, or it’s stifling and a shackle to be broken,” Aly said.

The Australia Talks Survey was designed to capture data that accurately represents the views of all Australians, not just those who answered the survey, by using weighted data.

ABC chair Ita Buttrose said it was designed to give an insight into what Australia is thinking.

“Most people think they know what everybody else is thinking but what we’re doing is looking for some proof of our thinking,” she said.

“It’s a fascinating insight into what’s making us tick and how the future of Australia needs to be shaped.”

For a full description of the survey methodology, click here.



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