Boeing promises ‘transparency’ to 737 Max buyers


The changes will need to be certified by aviation regulators before the jet is cleared to resume commercial flights, and the US Federal Aviation Administration announced a new panel to review the software.

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Regulatory decision

“The decision to return the Max to commercial service rests in the hands of global regulators,” Johndroe said. “In anticipation of that day, we are meeting with our customers in regional conferences to talk through the activities to prepare the fleet and implement the software and training requirements.”

The shares fell 3.9 per cent to $US357.23 at the close in New York after a downgrade by Barclays, which said that investors were underestimating the fallout from the crashes. Boeing’s drop was the biggest on the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as US markets fell sharply amid fears of a worsening trade war between the US and China.

The FAA is convening a panel of outside experts from the Air Force, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a Transportation Department center to review Boeing’s software fixes for the Max.

The panel’s recommendations will “directly inform the FAA’s decision concerning the 737 Max fleet’s safe return to service,” the US regulator said in a statement announcing the Technical Advisory Board. The FAA and Boeing have been working closely on the software update, but the Chicago-based planemaker hasn’t completed its work.

Boeing shares fell nearly 4 per cent on Tuesday. Credit:AP

Existing reviews

The new panel is separate from two other existing reviews created by the FAA. The agency has called for a summit of international regulators later this month to discuss its safety analysis of the aircraft.

The FAA is also conducting a Joint Authorities Technical Review, which consists of eight other countries and the European Aviation Safety Agency, that will examine the Max’s original certification. That work is expected to take three months, with initial meetings held in Seattle last week.bhp+billiton

EASA is running its own review of 737 Max’s design, and vowed not to allow flights of Boeing’s best-selling jet until its probe is finished.

Bloomberg

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